Progress!

It’s been a long time without an update on this site, but fortunately there has been some action taking place in the background, and I’m finally getting around to posting an update.

All the bows are up! It feels like it’s been forever since this project started, and there is still a long way to go, but at least it’s finally at the point where it looks like a shed and the end is in sight. Not that there isn’t still a long way to go, with over 500 bolts to put in place, gable ends including doors to build, and a roof to put on – but at least the basic shape is now in place, and the difficulty of putting heavy 20’ bows into a vertical position is behind me.

All bows in place

The new shed is 8’ longer than the old one, and 2’ wider, but with the lower knee walls it’s no higher – in fact it may be slightly shorter. It’s a bit hard to tell since I had the wheels taken off of the trailer for most of the time it was in the old shed, making the height of the roof off of the deck of the boat a little bigger. Once I get the boat settled in the new shed it should be very commodious, though.

Putting up the bows required some thought – putting up the last shed was done with 4 people, and it was constructed of dressed 1×3 and 2×3. This shed is built from rough-cut 1×4 and 2×4, and each bow is 20’ long instead of the first one’s 18’, so each bow is considerably heavier. And Dad and I put it up on our own, so brute strength wasn’t an option, we had to be more clever.

The first bows went up by placing two bows across the boat, attaching a section of ridgepole, and then connecting two more bows with pieces of carpet to the other side so that we could use them to push the whole thing up to the vertical. We were then able to pull that section to the back of the knee wall rails, level it up and secure it in place.

Of course I didn’t get pictures early enough, but here’s Dad attaching bows to that first section of ridgepole. You can see a few horizontal and diagonal braces, keeping it from shifting – it became very stable very quickly, this shed is definitely a lot more solid than the last one.

Starting to put up the bows

The second section of ridgepole we did just like the first, except we only had one bow on each side since we were able to attach it immediately to the first piece of ridgepole, so it didn’t need to be self-supporting.

Second section of ridgepole up

The third section of ridgepole was only 8’ long (to make 48’ I used 15’ pieces at either end, and 10’ and 8’ in the middle), and I figured it would stay up alright just being attached at it’s end to the already-standing ridgepole, which turned out to be true. It was the easiest section, and I don’t have pictures of it just hanging there, but here it is with most of the bows for three sections up:

Over halfway there

The last piece of ridgepole is 15’ long, and wouldn’t hang there if attached without support, and needed to be off of the end of the boat, so we attached two bows to it on the ground, with bracing, and using a rope and pulley attached to the already-erected ridgepole we hoisted it into position and attached it. It was then a quick run to the end of the bow placement. Very satisfying!

Last section of ridgepole
Last section of ridgepole
Last section of ridgepole

And now for some gratuitous shots of various stages of the construction!

Shed construction
Shed construction
Shed construction
Shed construction
Shed construction
Shed construction
Shed construction

This last one is from the driveway down toward the house – it’s hard to see the shed through the trees with the lighting, but it gives a sense of how much I’ll see it from the house and yard. Present, but not intrusive. Perfect!

From the driveway

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